LINCOLN SQUARE

Lincoln Square is one of those Chicago neighborhoods with a distinct personality all its own. The neighborhood, infused with a Bavarian allure, reveals specks of German culture in its annual festivals and the hearty foods of mother Deutschland (bratwurst and schnitzel). Rows of three- and four-flat buildings surround the neighborhood's main business and entertainment district, which is basically a single street lined with quaint storefront shops and restaurants, with a few single-family homes tucked among the multi-unit brick and stone residences. Lincoln Square is home to a vintage movie theater and the city's oldest bowling alleys, as well as Oktoberfest, where Chicagoans gather every year to celebrate their German roots and, of course, drink beer.

Commute Times

The Loop          by train,          by car

Merchandise Mart          by train,          by car

Union Station           by train,         by car

Millennium Park          by train,           by car

39m

20m

30m

17m

40m

18m

41m

19m

Boundaries

East to West - Ravenswood Avenue to Chicago River
North to South - Bryn Mawr and Peterson Avenues to Montrose Avenue
Nearby Neighborhoods - Andersonville, Sheridan Park, and Edgewater

Closed Prices:

$205,000 to $1,535,000

Median Sale Price:

$480,000

Average $ per sq ft:

$291

Association Fee Ranges:

$0, $115 to $425/mo

Square Footage:

800 to 5100 Sq. Ft.

Type:

Attached Home (Condo, Townhouse, Loft, etc.), Single-Family Home

Year Built:

Current Prices:

$180,000 to $799,000

Quick Facts

Bedrooms:

Bathrooms:

1 to 6 Bedrooms

1 to 5 Bathrooms

1870 to 2020

THE NEIGHBORS

Lincoln Square has become a popular place to live in recent years, and it's easy to see why. There are not only a variety of housing options (vintage apartments, renovated condos), but many are also quite large. However, the closer you are to Andersonville in the northeast, the more you will begin to pay for rent or a home.

WHAT TO EXPECT

The area is home to local college students, young professionals, and families, so the prices fit a wide range of budgets.

An assortment of architectural treasures.

Lincoln Square, which was founded in the late 1800s as a farming village, retains much of that simple charm in its buildings, which showcase styles from the Victorian era onward. Louis Sullivan, the famed Chicago School architect, lived in Lincoln Square, and his influence can be felt throughout the beautiful collection of buildings.

THE LIFESTYLE

Lincoln Square is bursting with interesting options for dining out.

Though its most popular draw is its collection of Europubs and cafes, it also has a wide range of other dining options, from high-end comfort food to mid-range, authentic wood-fired pizzerias to old-school sweet shops that have been preserved since the turn of the century.

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UNEXPECTED APPEAL

Plenty of iconic locations to explore, often sandwiched between other destinations.

THE MARKET

A mish-mash of different housing styles and prices.

YOU'LL FALL IN LOVE WITH

Quiet residential streets lined with bungalows, greystones, and brick two- and three-flats.

Lovely Victorian and Prairie School homes can be found along the North Branch of the Chicago River. New-construction options are also available in Lincoln Square and include single-family homes, townhomes, three-flat condominiums, and mid-rise buildings.

TRANSPORTATION

The L's Brown Line serves Lincoln Square, providing access to the rest of Chicago with ease. The Chicago River forms the area's western boundary, and offers lots of opportunities for enjoyment, from small parks to walking paths, and more.

Public Transport Passenger

ANNUAL FESTIVAL

Square Roots Festival

The weekend-long festival, which benefits the Lincoln Square Ravenswood Chamber of Commerce and the Old Town School of Folk Music and was founded in 1998, includes a mix of local restaurants and business vendors, more than a half-dozen (and counting) local breweries, and four stages of live music whose bookings are organized—albeit loosely—around roots and traditional music from around the world.